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Block Printing – Colouricious fabric design workshop

Would you and your textile group like to learn how to block print your own fabric? Jamie Malden MA BEd Hons is a textile tutor and has been teaching for over 30 years. Her passion is block printing and teaching. She is happy to travel any where and everywhere to teach groups how to use the Colouricious Wooden Printing Blocks to design unique fabric. These fabrics are wonderful for a wide selection of sewing projects. Look at the image below to be inspired to see what you can make with fabric that you have designed. All the printing blocks have been hand carved in India – have a look at the fascinating history of block printing

You can book a one, two or three day Colouricious block printing workshop.

Day One is learning all about the basics of block printing using pattern theory, composition and layering. All words that seem complicated but are very easy once you know how!

Day Two – you will learn how to combine the art of stencils and block printing accompanied by skills you learnt on day one of layering.

Day Three – takes you another step forward to learn the art of gelli printing – generally as a back ground, which then you will develop your own block printing style.

If this art form excites you, then all you have to do is contact Jamie Malden at colouricious@me.com to book your group 

 

block printing workshops

Hotels in Jaipur the Alsisar Haveli

Hotels Jaipur

Block Printing with Colouricious Holidays

Come on a wonderful block printing holiday to Jaipur. 

If you love arts and crafts, then you will I am sure, love to learn how to block print your own fabric. The art of block printing is an ancient Indian form of fabric printing using hand carved Indian wooden printing blocks. Block printed fabric has been produced in Jaipur for hundreds of years and is still very much a wonderful technique for fabric printing. Colouricious Holidays specialise in teaching their guests how to block print and we love to stay in wonderful hotels to make the whole holiday experience really wonderful. One of our absolute favourite hotels is called the Alisisar Hotel, which is actually a haveli. Haveli means a house built in a quadrant with a courtyard in the middle. This haveli belongs to a family who have 3 palaces and this particular haveli is their town house which they have converted into a gorgeous hotel. Have a little walk around this haveli to see how beautiful the accommodation is…

Hotels in Jaipur – Colouricious Block printing holiday

As you can imagine, it gets quite hot in India, so our guests really enjoyed the magnificent swimming pool at this haveli. The building is cream in colour and retains many of the original features that were enjoyed by their predecessors. Obviously the pool is new but really adds a special attraction to this hotel. Not only is the building beautiful but must say how lovely the staff are too. The food is truly delicious and luckily is made for the western market, i.e. not too spicy.

During the day our guests are off learning how to block print in authentic factories, with real printers using wooden printing blocks and at the end of a busy day, what a treat to come back to the Alsisar Haveli – one of our favourite hotels in Jaipur.

Come on a Colouricious Holiday and stay here with us!

 

Discover more about this wonderful block printing holiday to Jaipur.

Vietnam Textiles

Vietnam Textiles

There are many artistic avenues through which the Vietnamese express themselves such as silk painting, theatre, and wood carving. Below are explanations of the origins and development of a few key textiles and techniques. Vietnam textiles are beautiful.

Silk 

silk-weaving-hadong-vietnam Vietnam textiles have been amazing for centuries, Vietnam has been silk weaving and creating beautiful embroidery. During feudal times silk was thought of as a great luxury, only worn by kings, queens and mandarins. Through out history and its dynasties, Vietnam has always had rules concerning colour, ornamentation, style and fabric of clothes worn by aristocrats. The clothes of those in power featured the royal symbols of dragons, phoenixes and tortoises.

Vietnam’s best silk is called ‘Ha Dong’ silk and comes from of Ha Tay, southwest of Hanoi in the Red River Delta. It is believed that the art of silk weaving originated here some 2,000 years ago. However it was between the 16th 18th centuries when this region’s silk industry flourished. Today, techniques and quality have changed but there are many villages that always have and still do produce silk, for example La Ca.

To produce silk, the first stage is the weaving of the cloth to make every thread uniformly in line to ensure a smooth and soft fabric. It is then soaked, washed, dried, kept with forest resin, dyed, and sun dried twice. The resin is extracted at different points of the season for different colours. This chemical free process creates beautifully shiny and durable silk.

Embroidery

vietnam-embroidery

All over Vietnam, its people use embroidery as a form of cultural expression. It was introduced into the northprovinces of Vietnam during the 17th century from China, when originally silk embroidery only used five thread colours – yellow, red, green, violet and blue.

However embroidery is thought to have existed in the village of Van Lam for seven centuries. More than 75% of the population is skilled in the embroidery with lace, due to teachings being passed down through generations. Their work varies from the size of a hand to large wall hangings. Tribes like the Hmong and Dao also use their own unique intricate embroidery and braiding styles to embellish their clothing. The Hmong also use beautiful batik designs to decorate their clothing.

Applique

Applique is used by the Hmong to set apart and identify particular tribes, but was first developed as a way of story telling. Now it has developed into an art form for many communities. This ancient technique involves sewing on fabric shapes by hand to produce decorative patterns and shapes.

hmong-vietnam-embroidery Hmong-applique-vietnam  Hmong-vietnam-embroidery

If you’d like to find out more about these techniques and get involved in the culture, Colouricious are running a textile trip to Vietnam in November 2015. If you would like to find out more, do not hesitate to visit our website or contact us below.

V&A Exhibition The Fabric of India

V&A Exhibition The Fabric of India

colouricious-Indian-fabric-India

V&A Exhibition The Fabric of India – This exhibition at the V&A Museum in London is one of the most exhibitions to visit, in our opinion. Visit this exhibition to learn about the heritage and culture of Indian textiles, in what The Times newspaper refers to as dazzling craftsmanship. What is really magnificent is Tipu Sultan’s tent which is the largest item in the exhibition. Not sure about the 19th century dress embellished with beetle wings. During the last Colouricious block printing holiday to Jaipur, we did actually see a local craftsman processing these beetle wings. So that textile technique still goes on. Many of the 10,000 items have been part of the collection made by the East India Company that was created in the 18th century. As you travel through the exhibition,  you will learn about raw materials, from silks, cotton, wool, goat hair, and move onto natural dyeing techniques from Indigo to pomegranate, block printing and weaving. The most exciting aspect of this exhibition is that so many of these techniques have been witnessed by guests attending our Colouricious Textile Holidays. So please do go and visit this exhibition to start your journey of discovery for Indian textiles.

Go visit this fabulous exhibition of The fabric of India at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Having been to this exhibition and are hungry to learn more about Indian textiles, then come on a

Colouricious Textile Holiday to India

Wax Print

Wax Print

Wax print or Batik originated in India. The word batik actually means ‘wax writing’.

To decorate cloth by wax print you have to cover a part of the cloth with a coat of wax and then dye the cloth. When the wax is removed the contrast between the dyed and undyed areas makes the pattern, as the waxed areas keep their original colour.
The beauty of wax print is its simplicity. Some of the best effects in batik are often achieved by chance. Batik is very popular in southern India and is an amazing way of printing fabric.

Wax print is an amazing way of textile design and you will be able to experience it up close on our Colouricious textile tour to Southern India. You will be able to try it out for yourself when you get home, and achieve some amazing results. Wax print designs come in a large range of colours and patterns and you will be amazed when you see the whole textile printing process.

You will love our Colouricious textile tour to Southern India to see wax print up close! Everyone who loves textile art will love this!

Have a look at our other textile tours, perfect for everyone who is in love with arts and crafts!


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