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Category Archives: Art Textiles

Ribbon Embroidery Designs & Stitches on block printing

Ribbon Embroidery Designs & Stitches – Marilyn Pipe

Ribbon embroidery and other designs can really spruce up your work. Embroidered fabric alone looks savvy and beautiful but adding a bit of ribbon can really bring out more colour and levels to your design. By adding ribbon, the design becomes more unique. It adds dimensions especially looking at it from a side-on perspective. In the example above, you can see how the ribbon-made rose adds a 3D effect to the design. It also makes the embroidery look sophisticated and special. You can really make it your own with the little details.

Marilyn Pipe really shows how the little details can bring a design to life. The white compliments the stitching and flower design. The contrast between the colours against the background fabric makes the design look vibrant. You can try this yourself on a number of things. Why not try to creating the rose effect on a pair of gloves?

The stitching really creates the overall design. You can do anything from flowers to music notes to a city skyline. The possibilities are endless. What we love about this particular design is how fresh and complicated it looks while still being very achievable.

Want more inspiration on ribbon embroidery? Read more here!

 

How to use Lutradur – Industrial material for Textile Art

What is Lutradur? Introduction to textile techniques with Jamie Malden

Lutradur is a multifunctional fabric perfect for textile art. Being the sturdy material it is, it not only can be used to make beautiful landscape pieces but also when burnt can be made into little boxes. I love the idea that you can make pretty lamp shades out of the material. You can really be creative.

The sunset acrylic dyes really bring lutradur to life. Plus you can use it to compliment other fabrics by adding shaped versions of it. You can turn the fabric into much more than just a fabric. It can become your starting piece for elaborate art. It reads well into motifs and can be structured to create images. For instance, why not try making a flower pattern?

Also, you can use the material for textiled backgrounds. Amazingly, the lampshades come out super creative and fun. They speak for themselves, have a look:

What would you do with Lutradur? tell us in the comments of this video by pressing here!

For more inspiration on the material, visit our web page by pressing here!

 

Embellishing | Dry Needle Felting – Learn How To

Embellishing workshop with Myfanwy Hart – Learn for yourself!

Embellishing is something fun and unique to each person. You can pick your own favourite colour yarn and co-ordination of colours to work well with the chosen felt as well. In this how to, Myfanwy Hart shows us a simple step-by-step guide on embellishing.

Taking the felt, you can choose your yarn and create a meshed-together surface. Getting more in tune with the machine is the first step. Improving your relationship with the sewing machine makes the embellishing process a lot smoother. With confidence comes great creativity!

Basic straight laid yarns is the foundation needed in order to progress your skills. The straight yarns look great too! Using colour and angles you can really bring it to life!

There are different types of yarn to use but in this example, Myfanwy is using pink wool. Always start in the middle as it’s easiest. When starting, be slow and consistent. This helps your yarned felt come out as you want it to best.

What can you do with this skill? As seen in the video, you can create funky covers for notebooks, sheets to decorate your home, clothes and much more. Jamie goes on to show how she turned a finished felt piece into a decorative addition to an old scarf. Amazing!

The more you work on the piece the more integrated and stronger it becomes!

Watch some more of our videos here!

To look at our range of activities press here

Talking Threads – Follow Textile Artists | Craft Television

Colouricious Holidays teamed up with the Country Channel to inspire a new meaning and love for threads, crafts and textiles with this 10-part series!

‘that’s where the excitement comes, you never ever know where it’s going to go. What it’s going to do’ Following the crafts and textile arts is part of the fun. Including many new styles and looks it really becomes a unique piece of art individual to each person and their individual taste!

‘the thing that keeps it very fresh for me is that no two pieces are alike’. With each piece of fabric being entirely unique, you, the artist, can take inspiration from new pieces. You can also look at art and fabric books for inspiration. Then onto creating your own version of each piece!

In this Craft TV special, ‘Talking thread’s follows the delights of textile art. By keeping up with renowned textile artists who have given up their time, we are delighted to learn alongside them how they work and what inspires them!Each episode features a renowned artist with demonstrations, interviews and an exclusive look into their portfolios. Experience fantastic textile workshops from the comfort of your own home!

This series is for creative people with an excited mind for art and craft. Threads are an integral part of textile arts. They also include quilting and silk painting. So there’s something there for every artistic mind!

To look at our range of activities press here

 

 

Vietnam Textiles

Vietnam Textiles

There are many artistic avenues through which the Vietnamese express themselves such as silk painting, theatre, and wood carving. Below are explanations of the origins and development of a few key textiles and techniques. Vietnam textiles are beautiful.

Silk 

silk-weaving-hadong-vietnam Vietnam textiles have been amazing for centuries, Vietnam has been silk weaving and creating beautiful embroidery. During feudal times silk was thought of as a great luxury, only worn by kings, queens and mandarins. Through out history and its dynasties, Vietnam has always had rules concerning colour, ornamentation, style and fabric of clothes worn by aristocrats. The clothes of those in power featured the royal symbols of dragons, phoenixes and tortoises.

Vietnam’s best silk is called ‘Ha Dong’ silk and comes from of Ha Tay, southwest of Hanoi in the Red River Delta. It is believed that the art of silk weaving originated here some 2,000 years ago. However it was between the 16th 18th centuries when this region’s silk industry flourished. Today, techniques and quality have changed but there are many villages that always have and still do produce silk, for example La Ca.

To produce silk, the first stage is the weaving of the cloth to make every thread uniformly in line to ensure a smooth and soft fabric. It is then soaked, washed, dried, kept with forest resin, dyed, and sun dried twice. The resin is extracted at different points of the season for different colours. This chemical free process creates beautifully shiny and durable silk.

Embroidery

vietnam-embroidery

All over Vietnam, its people use embroidery as a form of cultural expression. It was introduced into the northprovinces of Vietnam during the 17th century from China, when originally silk embroidery only used five thread colours – yellow, red, green, violet and blue.

However embroidery is thought to have existed in the village of Van Lam for seven centuries. More than 75% of the population is skilled in the embroidery with lace, due to teachings being passed down through generations. Their work varies from the size of a hand to large wall hangings. Tribes like the Hmong and Dao also use their own unique intricate embroidery and braiding styles to embellish their clothing. The Hmong also use beautiful batik designs to decorate their clothing.

Applique

Applique is used by the Hmong to set apart and identify particular tribes, but was first developed as a way of story telling. Now it has developed into an art form for many communities. This ancient technique involves sewing on fabric shapes by hand to produce decorative patterns and shapes.

hmong-vietnam-embroidery Hmong-applique-vietnam  Hmong-vietnam-embroidery

If you’d like to find out more about these techniques and get involved in the culture, Colouricious are running a textile trip to Vietnam in November 2015. If you would like to find out more, do not hesitate to visit our website or contact us below.


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